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This article in NSE

  1. Vol. 43 No. 1, p. 51-56
     
    Received: Aug 02, 2012
    Published: May 2, 2014


    * Corresponding author(s): eleanam@clemson.edu
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doi:10.4195/nse2012.0016

Incorporating a Soil Science Artifact into a University ePortfolio Assessment Tool

  1. Elena Mikhailova *a,
  2. Joshua Wertsa,
  3. Christopher Posta and
  4. Gail Ringb
  1. a Dep. of Forestry and Natural Resources, Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC 29634-0359
    b ePortfolio Program, Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC 29634-0359

Abstract

The ePortfolio is a useful educational tool that is utilized in many educational institutions to showcase student accomplishments and provide students with an opportunity to reflect on their educational progress. The objective of this study was to develop and test an artifact from an introductory soil science course to be included in the individual student ePortfolio utilizing Microsoft PowerPoint and Google Sites through Google Apps for Education. A State/Representative Soil Project developed for the FNR 204: Soil Information Systems course at Clemson University, taught in the fall of 2008, was used to create a PowerPoint presentation to be incorporated as an artifact for the ePortfolio. Fifty-seven students from various fields (forestry, wildlife biology, and environmental science) were surveyed following the exercise regarding the usefulness of including the PowerPoint presentation of the State/Representative Soil Project as an artifact in their ePortfolios. Students created an artifact for their ePortfolio, learned more about soil information systems, and completed a requirement for the course. Feedback was received on how to improve the artifact and its usability in their ePortfolio. Overall, student responses were positive, indicating that incorporation of the State/Representative Soil Project artifact can enhance their ePortfolios.

Impact Statement Digital learner portfolios are of growing importance in higher education and it is important to help students to create artifacts from soil science courses. This article describes an example of an artifact from an introductory-level soil science course. The artifact was well received by the students and faculty.

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Copyright © 2014. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Agronomy

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