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This article in JEQ

  1. Vol. 32 No. 4, p. 1490-1497
     
    Received: July 12, 2002
    Published: July, 2003


    * Corresponding author(s): dou@cahp.vet.upenn.edu
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doi:10.2134/jeq2003.1490

Efficacy of Alum and Coal Combustion By-Products in Stabilizing Manure Phosphorus

  1. Z. Dou *a,
  2. G. Y. Zhangb,
  3. W. L. Stoutc,
  4. J. D. Totha and
  5. J. D. Fergusona
  1. a Center for Animal Health and Productivity, School of Veterinary Medicine, Univ. of Pennsylvania, 382 West Street Road, Kennett Square, PA 19348
    b Soil Science Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, China
    c USDA-ARS, Pasture Systems and Watershed Management Research Laboratory, Curtin Road, University Park, PA 16802

Abstract

Animal manures contain large amounts of soluble phosphorus (P), which is prone to runoff losses when manure is surface-applied. Here we report the efficacy of alum and three coal combustion by-products in reducing P solubility when added to dairy, swine, or broiler litter manures in a laboratory incubation study. Compared with unamended controls, alum effectively reduced readily soluble P, determined in water extracts of moist manure samples with 1 h of shaking, for all three manures. The reduction ranged from 80 to 99% at treatment rates of 100 to 250 g alum kg−1 manure dry matter. The fluidized bed combustion fly ash (FBC) reduced readily soluble P by 50 to 60% at a rate of 400 g kg−1 for all three manures. Flue gas desulfurization by-product (FGD) reduced readily soluble P by nearly 80% when added to swine manure and broiler litter at 150 and 250 g kg−1 Another by-product, anthracite refuse fly ash (ANT), was ineffective for all three manures. In all cases, reduction in readily soluble P is primarily associated with inorganic phosphorus (Pi) with little change in organic phosphorus (Po). Sequential extraction results indicate that the by-product treatments shifted manure P from H2O-P into a less vulnerable fraction, NaHCO3−P, while the alum treatment shifted the P into even more stable forms, mostly NaOH-P. Such shifts in P fractions would have little influence on P availability for crops over the long term but would retard and reduce potential losses of P following manure applications.

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Copyright © 2003. American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science SocietyPublished in J. Environ. Qual.32:1490–1497.