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This article in JEQ

  1. Vol. 31 No. 2, p. 466-470
     
    Received: June 2, 2000
    Published: Mar, 2002


    * Corresponding author(s): bturner@nwisrl.ars.usda.gov
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doi:10.2134/jeq2002.4660

A Novel Technique for the Pre-Concentration and Extraction of Inositol Hexakisphosphate from Soil Extracts with Determination by Phosphorus-31 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

  1. Benjamin L. Turner * and
  2. Ian D. McKelvie
  1. Water Studies Centre and Chemistry Dep., Monash Univ., Clayton 3168, Victoria, Australia

Abstract

Inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) is often the dominant form of soil organic phosphorus (P), but is rarely investigated because of the analytical difficulties encountered in its extraction, separation, and detection in environmental samples. In particular, recent advances in the study of soil organic P with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been of limited use for the study of IP6, because the technique does not discriminate between IP6 and other forms of P. This was addressed by developing a novel analytical procedure using the retentive properties of gel-filtration gels for IP6, which allows the combined selective extraction and pre-concentration of IP6 from soil extracts with determination by 31P NMR. While the technique is still in the developmental stage, the results demonstrate that the gel does not interfere with 31P NMR analysis and retains IP6 to concentrations well above those required to give clear spectral signals. The technique has considerable potential for application to the study of IP6 in soil extracts and water samples and, with development, could help to answer fundamental questions regarding the dynamics of organic P in the environment.

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Copyright © 2002. American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science SocietyPublished in J. Environ. Qual.31:466–470.

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