My Account: Log In | Join | Renew
Search
Author
Title
Vol.
Issue
Year
1st Page

Abstract

 

This article in CS

  1. Vol. 52 No. 3, p. 1132-1137
     
    Received: Aug 4, 2011
    Published: May, 2012


    * Corresponding author(s): melakebe@msu.edu
 View
 Download
 Alerts
 Permissions
 Share

doi:10.2135/cropsci2011.08.0409

Interactions of Selected Potato Cultivars and Populations of Meloidogyne hapla Adapted to the Midwest U.S. Soils

  1. Haddish Melakeberhan *a,
  2. David Douchesb and
  3. Wei Wangc
  1. a Nematologist, Department of Horticulture, Plant and Soil Science Building, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824
    b Breeder, Plant and Soil Science Building, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824S
    c Statistician, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Plant and Soil Science Building, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824

Abstract

Meloidogyne hapla Chitwood is among the most serious nematode pests in temperate vegetable crops grown in rotation with potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), a crop with known resistance to potato cyst. While the types of agronomic trait improvements, crops, and pests are limited by resources, preserving improved crops in a rotation system requires understanding their performance against nontarget pests such as M. hapla. In greenhouse experiments, the interactions of four populations of M. hapla (Mh 1, Mh 2, Mh 3, and Mh 4) and six potato cultivars and lines, including ‘Boulder’ and ‘Missaukee’ with the H1 gene, were tested. The potato cultivars showed a 12 to 33% degree of suitability to the populations of M. hapla when compared with tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. [syn. Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), the host in which the populations were cultured, indicating that buildup of the populations of M. hapla potentially may be a problem. However, the responses varied by M. hapla population and potato cultivar interactions, suggesting that the management challenges will be site specific. Of the four M. hapla populations, Mh 3, an isolate from sandy soil under extended methyl bromide and other pesticide application, was the most pathogenic. The study provides critical data for developing agro-biologically integrated approaches to managing nematode parasitic variability.

  Please view the pdf by using the Full Text (PDF) link under 'View' to the left.

Copyright © 2012. Copyright © by the Crop Science Society of America, Inc.