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This article in CS

  1. Vol. 47 No. 2, p. 722-727
     
    Received: May 25, 2006
    Published: Mar, 2007


    * Corresponding author(s): smason1@unl.edu
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doi:10.2135/cropsci2006.05.0346

Crop Rotation and Soil Amendment Alters Sorghum Grain Quality

  1. Nanga Mady Kaye,
  2. Stephen C. Mason *,
  3. David S. Jackson and
  4. Tom D. Galusha
  1. Dep. of Agronomy and Horticulture, and Food Science and Technology, Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68583-0915. Paper No. 14668 of the Journal Series of the Nebraska Agric. Res. Div. Research supported by USAID Grant No. DAN 1254-G-0021 through INTSORMIL, the International Sorghum and Millet Collaborative Research Program

Abstract

Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] rotation enhances grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] yield, but influence on grain quality has not been measured. The objective was to determine the effect of cropping sequence (CS) and soil amendment (SA) on grain yield and quality. Sorghum grain yield and quality, soil NO3–N and water were measured in a rotation study in 2003 and 2004 on a Sharpsburg silty clay loam (fine, smectitic, mesic Typic Argiudoll). Cropping sequences were continuous sorghum, and sorghum rotated with non-nodulating and nodulating soybean. Soil amendments consisted of no amendment, manure (17–26 Mg dry matter ha−1 yr−1), and N (84 kg ha−1 yr−1). CS × SA interaction effects were found for most parameters. Rotation with non-nodulating soybean without SA increased yield by 2.6 to 2.8 Mg ha−1 over continuous sorghum without SA. Rotation without SA with nodulating soybean further increased yield by 1.7 to 1.8 Mg ha−1 over rotation with non-nodulating soybean. Grain N increased by 0.5 to 1.0, 2.5 to 5.0, and 3.3 to 4.9 g kg−1 for N application to continuous sorghum and sorghum rotated with non-nodulating and nodulating soybean, respectively. Tangential abrasive dehulling device (TADD) removal indicated that continuous sorghum without SA produced the softest grain with 43 to 44% TADD removal, and sorghum rotated with nodulating soybean with manure produced the hardest grain with 22 to 27% TADD removal. As food end-use opportunities for sorghum grain evolve, use of crop rotation and SA application will be important to produce grain with desirable quality attributes.

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