My Account: Log In | Join | Renew
Search
Author
Title
Vol.
Issue
Year
1st Page

Abstract

 

This article in CS

  1. Vol. 38 No. 4, p. 996-1003
     
    Received: July 23, 1997
    Published: July, 1998


    * Corresponding author(s): wjc3@cornell.edu
 View
 Download
 Alerts
 Permissions
 Share

doi:10.2135/cropsci1998.0011183X003800040019x

Corn Growth and Yield under Different Crop Rotation, Tillage, and Management Systems

  1. Jeremy W. Singer and
  2. William J. Cox 
  1. Dep. of Soil, Crop and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY 14853

Abstract

Abstract

Rotation effects on corn (Zea mays L.) growth have not been documented. Our objective was to evaluate dry matter (DM) and N accumulation of corn following corn, soybean [Glycine max (L.)Merr.], or wheat/red clover (Triticum aestivum L./Trifolium pratense L.) using moldboard plow, chisel, and ridge tillage under high (broadcast herbicides and 163 kg N ha−1) and low chemical management (banded herbicides and 95 kg N ha−1). In 1993, corn following soybean, compared with corn under high chemical management, had greater DM and N accumulation during vegetative development but similar N accumulation after silking (45 kg ha−1) and yield (7.6 and 7.2 Mg ha−1, respectively). In 1994, corn following soybean, compared with corn under high chemical management, had similar DM and N accumulation during vegetative development, but greater N accumulation (59 and 35 kg ha−1, respectively) after silking and yield (11.4 and 10.7 Mg ha−1). Corn following wheat/clover under both management systems, compared with corn following corn under high chemical management, had greater DM and N accumulation during vegetative development in 1994. Corn following wheat/clover under high chemical management had the greatest N accumulation after silking (79 kg ha−1) and yield (12.0 Mg ha−1), whereas the other two systems had the same N accumulation after silking and yield. Corn yield had linear responses to N accumulation after silking in 1993 (r2 = 0.47) and 1994 (r2 = 0.87). We conclude that N accumulation after silking influenced the yield response to rotation more than DM and N accumulation during vegetative development did.

  Please view the pdf by using the Full Text (PDF) link under 'View' to the left.

Copyright © .