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This article in CS

  1. Vol. 38 No. 1, p. 231-236
     
    Received: Mar 12, 1997
    Published: Jan, 1998


    * Corresponding author(s): mes12@cornell.edu
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doi:10.2135/cropsci1998.0011183X003800010039x

Chromosomal Location of Genes for Resistance to Karnal Bunt in Wheat

  1. J. C. Nelson,
  2. J. E. Autrique,
  3. G. Fuentes-Dávila and
  4. M. E. Sorrells 
  1. Dep. of Plant Breeding and Biometry, 252 Emerson Hall, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Wheat Program, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Apdo. Postal 6-641, 06600 Mexico, D.F., Mexico

Abstract

Abstract

Karnal bunt (Tilletia indica Mitra) infestation of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) kernels reduces grain quality. Deployment of genetic resistance would be preferable to chemical applications for control of the disease. Inoculation studies were carried out in a wheat mapping population with the aim of locating genes for resistance. Recombinant inbred (RI) lines from a cross between a resistant synthetic wheat (Triticum turgidum ‘Altar 84’ & T. tauschii) and the susceptible common wheat cultivar ‘Opata 85’ were inoculated with Karnal bunt sporidial suspension and evaluated for symptom development in the field for three seasons and in the greenhouse. Based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses, regions on chromosome arms 3BS and SAL carrying marker alleles from the Altar durum parent were consistently associated with reduced kernel disease. Main marker effects accounted for up to 32% of disease variation in the field but only 15% in the greenhouse, where the level of disease was higher, suggesting an environmental component of resistance. The tagging of these Karnal bunt partial-resistance genes in tetraploid and hexaploid backgrounds may facilitate the accumulation of resistance via marker-assisted transfer to susceptible durum and common wheat cultivars. This practice should reduce laborious disease screening requirements.

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