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This article in CS

  1. Vol. 37 No. 4, p. 1306-1316
     
    Received: May 15, 1996
    Published: July, 1997


    * Corresponding author(s): jbhollan@iastate.edu
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doi:10.2135/cropsci1997.0011183X003700040047x

QTLs and Epistasis Associated with Vernalization Responses in Oat

  1. J. B. Holland ,
  2. H. S. Moser,
  3. L. S. O'Donoughue and
  4. M. Lee
  1. Dep. of Agronomy, Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA 50011
    Maricopa Agric. Center, Univ. of Arizona, Maricopa, AZ 37860
    DNA Landmarks, Inc., P.O. Box 6, St-Jean sur Richelieu, Quebec, Canada, J3B 6Z1

Abstract

Abstract

Oat (Avena sativa L.) genotypes differ in their patterns of growth and development in response to vernalization (cold temperatures applied to germinating seeds). Genomic regions controlling vernalization response in heading date, plant height, and tiller number were mapped in a recombinant inbred (RI) population derived from the cross of oat cultivars ‘Kanota’ (vernalization-responsive) and ‘Ogle’ (vernalization-insensitive).Seventy-one F6-derived RI lines were subjected to vernalization and no-vernalization treatments, and then grown in growth chambers. A genetic linkage map of 561 (primarily RFLP) loci was used to identify quantitativet rait loci (QTLs) affecting the traits in vernalized and non-vernalized plants. Nine to 16 linkage groups and unlinked loci were associated with each trait assessed herein. Individual loci explained up to 37% of the phenotypic variation. Three to five significant loci were included in multiple locus linear models which explained up to 66% of phenotypic variation for each trait. One to 14 interactions between loci were found for each trait. The interactions explained up to 30% of the phenotypic variation not accounted for by the main effects of loci involved in the interactions. Inclusion of epistatic interactions tended to improve the fit of multiple locus models. As much as 83% of phenotypic variation was explained by multiple locus models including epistasis. Numerous epistatic interactions involving at least one locus with no significant main effect were detected.

.Journal Paper No. 16948 of the Iowa Agric. Home Economics Exp. Stn, Ames, IA. Projects No. 3368 and 3134.

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