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This article in CS

  1. Vol. 35 No. 4, p. 995-1001
     
    Received: June 24, 1994
    Published: July, 1995


    * Corresponding author(s): prioul@ibp.upsud.fr
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doi:10.2135/cropsci1995.0011183X003500040011x

Sucrose Phosphate Synthase: An Enzyme with Heterotic Activity Correlated with Maize Growth

  1. Mathilde Causse,
  2. Jean-Paul Rocher,
  3. Sandrine Pelleschi,
  4. Yves Barrière,
  5. Dominique de Vienne and
  6. Jean-Louis Prioul 
  1. Station de Génétique Végétale, INRA, CNRS-URA 1492, UPS, La Ferme du Moulon, 91190 Gif/Yvette, France
    Structure et Métabolisme des Plantes, Institut de Recherche sur les Plantes, CNRS-URA 1128 , Bât 630, Université de Paris Sud,, 91405 Orsay Cedex France
    Station d'Amélioration des Plantes Fourragères, INRA, 86600 Lusignan France

Abstract

Abstract

Identification of biochemical determinants linked to growth that can be quantitated early in seedling development may be important for breeding purposes. Carbohydrate metabolism is a good candidate for such an approach. The genetic variation and inheritance of the activity of two key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) and ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADPGppase), were studied in maize (Zea mays L.) third and fourth leaves in a half 5 × 5 diallel design, Early greenhouse growth traits (estimated in two trials) and field performances (2 locations × 2 years) were also measured. Genetic variation was observed in greenhouse-grown leaf tissues for SPS activities under limiting and nonlimiting substrate concentrations, representing the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated state of the enzyme, respectively. Heterosis for SPS was significant in both conditions. In hybrids, SPS activity in the fourth leaf was significantly correlated with the forage dry matter yield measured in the field in 1991 (r = 0.89***, 0.87***, 0.71*, and 0.42 ns, depending on the location), suggesting that SPS activity could be a limiting factor of maize development; but no significant correlations were detected between SPS activities and forage yield measured the next year in two locations. The ADPGppase activity of hybrids was not significantly different from that of parental lines.

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Copyright © 1995. Crop Science Society of America, Inc.Copyright © 1995 by the Crop Science Society of America, Inc.