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  1. Vol. 28 No. 5, p. 811-818
     
    Received: June 26, 1987
    Published: Sept, 1988


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doi:10.2135/cropsci1988.0011183X002800050019x

Modeling the Effects of Light, Carbon Dioxide, and Temperature on the Growth of Potato

  1. Brian S. Yandell ,
  2. Amina Najar,
  3. Raymond Wheeler and
  4. Theodore W. Tibbitts
  1. Department of Horticulture, 1575 Linden Dr., Wisconsin Agric. Exp. Stn., Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706

Abstract

Abstract

This study examined the effects of light, temperature and carbon dioxide on the growth of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) in a controlled environment in order to ascertain the best growing conditions for potato in life support systems in space. ‘Norland’ and ‘Russet Burbank’ were grown in 6-L pots of peat-vermiculite for 56 d in growth chambers at the University of Wisconsin Biotron. Environmental factor levels included continuous light (24-h photoperiod) at 250, 400, and 550 μmol m−2 s−1 PPF; constant temperature at 16, 20, and 24 °C; and CO2 at approximately 400, 1000 and 1600 μL L−1. Separate effects analysis and ridge analysis provided a means to examine the effects of individual environmental factors and to determine combinations of factors that are expected to give the best increases in yields over the central design point. The response surface of Norland indicated that tuber yields were highest with moderately low temperature (18.7 °C), low CO2 (400 μL L−1) and high light (550 μmol m−2 s−1 PPF). These conditions also favored shorter stem growth. Russet Burbank tuber yields were highest at moderately low temperature (17.5 °C), high CO, (1600 μL L−1) and medium light (455 μmol m−2 s−1 PPF). Models generated from these analyses will be used to project the most efficient conditions for growth of potatoes in closed ecological life support systems (CELSS) in space colonies.

Research supported by the College of Agric. and Life Sci. of the Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, USDA CSRS grant 511-100 and NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC-2-301. Computing was performed on the College of Agric. and Life Sci. and the Dep. of Statistics computers.

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