My Account: Log In | Join | Renew
Search
Author
Title
Vol.
Issue
Year
1st Page

Abstract

 

This article in AJ

  1. Vol. 99 No. 3, p. 692-700
     
    Received: June 21, 2006
    Published: May, 2007


    * Corresponding author(s): dev50@clark.nscee.edu
 View
 Download
 Alerts
 Permissions

doi:10.2134/agronj2006.0183

Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Salts on Fairways and Greens Irrigated with Reuse Water

  1. D. A. Devitt *a,
  2. M. Locketta,
  3. R. L. Morrisb and
  4. B. M. Birda
  1. a Dep. of Biological Sciences, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154-4004
    b Cooperative Extension, Univ. of Nevada Reno, Las Vegas, NV 89123

Abstract

A 4-yr study was conducted to assess the impact of reuse water on soil salinization of nine golf courses in southern Nevada: three long-term reuse courses, three fresh-water courses, and three courses that transitioned to reuse water during the experimental period. Four of nine fairways had positive leaching fractions (LFs) during all 4 yr, with statistical separation occurring based on 4-yr averages (p < 0.001). Soil salinity levels followed a sinusoidal seasonal curve, with 70% of all peaks associated with summer months. Salinity contour maps (surface soil) were compared over time. More than 85% of the surface area of greens were mapped as electrical conductivity of saturation extract (ECe) < 4.0 dS m−1, whereas 64% of the fairways were mapped at ECe < 4.0 dS m−1 This salinity relationship dropped to 13% on fairways of long-term reuse courses. Changes in the average ECe values after transition to reuse water were primarily driven by the number of days a course had been irrigated with reuse water (R 2 = 0.69***). Depth-averaged salinity (sensors) was found to be highly correlated with LF on reuse courses (R 2 = 0.86***) and transitional courses (R 2 = 0.87***). Yearly changes in depth-averaged sensor values on transitional courses were described by an equation that included the number of days a golf course was irrigated with reuse water, the LF, and the uniformity of the irrigation system (R 2 = 0.83***). Although deficit irrigating can be practiced for short periods, adequate LFs are essential for the long-term success of golf courses irrigated with reuse water.

  Please view the pdf by using the Full Text (PDF) link under 'View' to the left.

Copyright © 2007. American Society of AgronomyAmerican Society of Agronomy

Facebook   Twitter