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American Society of Agronomy
5585 Guilford Road • Madison, WI 53711-5801 • 608-273-8080 • Fax 608-273-2021
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NEWS RELEASE
Contact: Susan V. Fisk, Public Relations Director, 608-273-8091, sfisk@sciencesocieties.org

Environmental pathway of antibiotic resistance: Where will it lead us?

What can be done on farms to limit the spread of antibiotic resistant genes?

October 9, 2013 -- In recent studies performed near the Poudre River, Colorado, scientists are studying antibiotic resistance (ABR) genes in soil sediments. They have found a strong correlation between wastewater contamination and agricultural operations and the levels of ABR genes in the sediments. They have also found a correlation between the number of heads of cattle, and their distance to water with ABR near the river.

To address this topic, Amy Pruden, PhD, will present “Environmental Pathway of Antibiotic Resistance: Where Will It Lead Us?” on Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2013 at 3 PM. The presentation is part of the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and the Soil Science Society of America Annual Meetings, Nov. 3-6 in Tampa, Florida. The theme of this year’s conference is “Water, Food, Energy, & Innovation for a Sustainable World” (www.acsmeetings.org).

Pruden and other researchers are studying how to manage these problems, which was recently published in Environmental Health Perspectives. (http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/1206446/) What can be done on farms to limit the spread of ABR genes? Pruden’s talk will highlight techniques like composting manure, lagoons, and other best management practices.

Media Invitation: Members of the media receive complimentary registration to the joint meetings. Contact: Susan V. Fisk, 608-273-8091, sfisk@sciencesocieties.org. Please RSVP by October 25, 2013

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If you would like a 1-on-1 interview with Dr. Pruden, contact Susan Fisk at the email above.

The American Society of Agronomy (ASA) www.agronomy.org, is a scientific society helping its 8,000+ members advance the disciplines and practices of agronomy by supporting professional growth and science policy initiatives, and by providing quality, research-based publications and a variety of member services.